NJ Foraging Calendar April 2018

NJ Foraging Calendar April 2018

With the heat a few days ago and now the rain, we're going to have plenty of fresh wild plants to forage in the upcoming weeks.

Here's a list of some species to look out for. There are many common, easy species here, as well as some more eclectic selections for those of you interested in some new flavors. This is just a list to get you started - please verify identification, edibility, and edible parts yourself -- or drop me a note in the comments field below and I'll answer any queries. Happy gathering!

  • Alliaria petiolata   garlic mustard
  • Allium cernuum   nodding onion
  • Allium tricoccum   ramps
  • Allium vineale   wild garlic
  • Cardamine bulbosa   bulbous bittercress
  • Cardamine concatenata   cutleaf toothwort
  • Claytonia virginica   spring beauty
  • Cryptotaenia canadensis   Canadian honewort
  • Hemerocallis fulva   orange daylily
  • Hesperis matronalis   dames rocket
  • Hydrophyllum virginianum   eastern waterleaf
  • Lamium purpureum   purple deadnettle
  • Matteuccia struthiopteris   ostrich fern
  • Polygonatum biflorum   smooth Solomon's seal
  • Polygonatum pubescens   hairy Solomon's seal
  • Prenanthes altissima   tall rattlesnakeroot
  • Rudbeckia laciniata   tall coneflower/sochan
  • Rumex crispus   curly dock
  • Stellaria media   common chickweed
  • Taraxacum officinale   common dandelion
  • Tradescantia virginiana   Virginia spiderwort
  • Urtica dioica   stinging nettle
  • Viola sororia   common blue violet
 First spring greens of the season, 3/31/18.  Chickweed, tall coneflower, stinging nettle, dandelion, curly dock, field garlic, dame's rocket, nodding onion, purple dead nettle  Cooked in olive oil with smoked salt. The greens were tiny then, but are much more abundant now, two weeks later.

First spring greens of the season, 3/31/18.

Chickweed, tall coneflower, stinging nettle, dandelion, curly dock, field garlic, dame's rocket, nodding onion, purple dead nettle

Cooked in olive oil with smoked salt. The greens were tiny then, but are much more abundant now, two weeks later.